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  • This is the companion site to the EASA Media Anthropology Network workshop and research project Critical Perspectives on Media and Social Change. The workshop will be held on 27 May 2011 at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London.

Bourdieu and “history”, by Sherry Ortner

Anthropology of this Century, Issue 8 October 2013, London Philip S. Gorski, ed., Bourdieu and Historical Analysis. Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2013. vii + 422 pp. Tables, figures, appendices, works cited, contributors, and index. $99.95 U.S. (cl). ISBN 978-0-8223-5255-6; $27.95 (pb). ISBN 978-0-8332-5273-0. Review by Sherry Ortner Pierre Bourdieu (photograph by Leonardo Antoniadis) … Continue reading

Bourdieu as a theorist of change

H-France Review Vol. 13 (September 2013), No. 149 Philip S. Gorski, ed., Bourdieu and Historical Analysis. Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2013. vii + 422 pp. Tables, figures, appendices, works cited, contributors, and index. $99.95 U.S. (cl). ISBN 978-0-8223-5255-6; $27.95 (pb). ISBN 978-0-8332-5273-0. Review by Deborah Reed-Danahay, State University of New York at Buffalo. … Continue reading

Human character changed in 1995

By Rebecca Solnit (original title: In the Day of the Postman) London Review of Books In or around June 1995 human character changed again. Or rather, it began to undergo a metamorphosis that is still not complete, but is profound – and troubling, not least because it is hardly noted. When I think about, say, … Continue reading

Schatzki on change, practice theory and large sociotechnical phenomena

Excerpt from “Where the Action Is (On Large Social Phenomena Such as Sociotechnical Regimes)” by  Ted Schatzki, November 2011, Working Paper 1, Sustainable Practices Research Group. Now, an important fact about activities — doings and sayings — is that they are events, or happenings. I mention this in part because an event is not the … Continue reading

Julian Assange’s theory of change, in his own words

Quantum mechanics and its modern evolution left me with a theory of change and how to properly understand how one thing causes another. My interest was then in reversing this thought process and adapting it to another realm. We have an end state that we want, and I looked at all the changes that are … Continue reading

When “culture” erases history

by Ryan on April 17, 2013. This post originally appeared on the blog Savage Minds and is reposted under CC-BY-NC. Sure, sometimes “culture” can tell us a lot about human behavior and differences.  But there are also times when arguments based upon the concept of culture can obscure just as much as they reveal. Right now … Continue reading

What if Margaret Thatcher had never been?

via BBC News Privatisation, finance boom, manufacturing decline, home ownership, union laws. The UK changed hugely in the 1980s. But how much of that would have happened if Margaret Thatcher had never taken office, asks historian Dominic Sandbrook. In the summer of 1970, a week after their local MP had joined the cabinet for the … Continue reading

The temporalities of labour history

Notes from the Chapter 9 section “The Temporalities of Labor History”, Sewell WH, Jr (2005) Logics of History: Social theory and social transformation. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press. p. 273 Temporality of any historical sequence is complex, i.e. ‘combination of many different social processes with varying temporalities’. Three types of temporality: Trends = ‘directional … Continue reading

Change and inconsistency

Extracted from the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy The most general conception of change is simply difference or nonidentity in the features of things. Thus we speak of the change of temperature from place-to-place along a body, or the change in atmospheric pressures from place-to-place as recorded by isobars, or the change of height of the … Continue reading

Millikan: conventions are sustained by weight of precedent

Extract from entry “Convention“, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (2011) …Ruth Millikan (2005) offers a radical alternative to the views surveyed so far. She draws inspiration not from economics or sociology but from biology. On her view, a convention is a pattern of behavior reproduced within a population due largely to weight of precedent. To say … Continue reading

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